?

Log in

< back | 0 - 10 |  
charliecochrane [userpic]

The definitive (at present!) chronological list of Jonty and Orlando stories

May 4th, 2020 (11:58 am)

Early twentieth century:

Lessons in Love November 1905

Lessons in Desire August 1906

Lessons in Discovery November 1906

Lessons in Power Spring 1907

Lessons in Temptation July 1907

Lessons in Temptation missing scene July 1907

What the Mathematician said to the Statue Summer 1907

Lessons in Seduction September 1907

What the Mathematician said to the Engineer November 1907

My true love sent to me December 1907

My True Love sent to me postscript

Lessons in Trust Summer 1908

Resolution January 1909

Lessons for Suspicious Minds Summer 1909.

On the occasion of their anniversary November 1909

Wetting the baby's head missing scene, November 1909

Bloody Mathematicians Spring 1910

Lessons for Idle Tongues Summer 1910

May our days be merry and bright Winter 1910

A fit employment for a gentleman Summer 1912 (crossover 'fanfic')

Once we won matches Aug 1912

Ring in the New December 1913

Game of Chance 1916

All Lessons Learned Spring 1919

Lessons for Survivors, Autumn 1919

Lessons for Sleeping Dogs 1921

The Boy from Kings 1932

A random collection of silly things:

The Inadvertent Adventures of Johnny Stewart, Jonty's great-nephew.

Orlando's opinion on Matthew Bourne's Swan Lake.

Pride, Prejudice and all the rest.

Drabbles 1 Edwardian

Drabbles 2 Edwardian

Splitting Infinitives Edwardian, crossover 'fanfic'

Ten plus five plus eight = twenty three Edwardian crossover 'fanfic'

Love Letters, 1911 to 2011

Lessons in Disco 2010

charliecochrane [userpic]

Jonty says he rather fancies one of these

August 26th, 2016 (08:01 pm)



Orlando is, of course, horrified.

charliecochrane [userpic]

A Summer's Day

August 24th, 2016 (08:10 pm)

Title: A Summer’s Day: Shakespearean Anthology with a Twist

Authors: Nephy Heart, Louise Lyons, Rebecca Cohen, JL Merrow, Charlie Cochrane, Asta Idonea, Dianne Hartsock, Rory Ni Coileain, Kathy Griffith, M LeAnne Phoenix, Phetra H Novak, Rian Durant

I was delighted to get involved with this scrumptious project. I mean, "It Gets Better" plus Shakespeare - who wouldn't want to be part of it? Here's a snippet from my "Twelfth Night" inspired story, "If Music Be".

It’s Shakespeare, you know,” Eddie added, aware of the appeal the Bard had.
“That’s not fair. Which one?”
“‘Twelfth Night’.”
“Ah.” Funny how that play kept coming up today. And appropriate, too, given that Rick was sitting like Patience on a monument, smiling at grief. “Who have you still got to cast?”
“Bit parts only, I’m afraid. I didn’t think you’d be interested in anything too big at the moment. Do you fancy Antonio, the sea captain?” The serpent in the garden couldn’t have spoken so temptingly.
“Depends who he’s played by.”
“Very funny. I meant do you fancy playing him? It would help out an old mate. And it’s not a big part, as the—”
“Actress said to the bishop.” Rick looked at Coldstream, but the cat was keeping his own counsel, as usual. Antonio might be a small part but the character was intriguing, not least because he was one of two Antonios Shakespeare had portrayed as gay. “Okay. I’ll do it. Just for you.”
“Magic. It’ll be good to have you as my wing man again. Although I promise it won’t be as bad an experience as ‘Arsenic and Old Lace’.”
“I’m pulling out if it is.” Rick shuddered in remembrance of a particularly spiky old bat who’d played one of the leads. “E-mail me with all the details.”
“I’ll do it right now.”
Eddie had a good, logical mind, and he was a doer. He also possessed a disconcertingly honest streak that meant he’d soon tell Rick if his return to the stage wasn’t working out. This might be all right. Maybe.
“Am I barmy doing this?” he asked Coldstream, but the cat just went back to licking his tail.

Buy Links:

Amazon.com | Amazon UK | Amazon CA | Amazon AUS

Smashwords

charliecochrane [userpic]

Guest author Dianne Hartsock

August 22nd, 2016 (08:26 am)

Great to have my fellows 'Summer's dayer' Dianne popping in today.

What inspired you to join The Summer's Day project?

I was super excited to be asked to join The Summer’s Day project. It sounded like such an intriguing idea. Take a Shakespearean play and turn it into my own story? I could do that. Shakespeare has such terrific plays to choose from. And the fact that it’s for charity just makes it that much more fun.

How did your story take form in your mind?

That was easy! The Two Gentlemen of Verona is about Valentine, half in love with his best friend Proteus, who in turn loves the beautiful Julia. Val travels to Milan to seek his fortune. Proteus follows. They both fall in love with the lovely Silvia. Proteus betrays Valentine to Silvia’s father and Valentine flees into the forest where he is made the king of a band of outlaws. Julia dresses as a man to be near Proteus…

As you can see, all the drama I could want is in this play! I simply put all these elements into a modern setting and let the story unfold.

What did it feel like watching your first book fledge and leave the nest?

Simple relief! That first book was a trial by fire. ALEX, my psychological thriller, took me a year to write, another four months with an editor. Then, when it was picked up by a publisher, one month before it was due to be released, the publishing company folded. I received my rights back, but it was devastating, to say the least. Luckily, I found a new publisher for it. Needless to say, all my other publishing experiences have been much more pleasant.

Are you character or plot driven? What do you do if one of your characters starts developing at a tangent?

Definitely character driven, and I’m all about emotion, climbing right into my character’s mind and body to live the story through their eyes. How they experience a scene, especially their emotional response, propels my story forward.

And I love when a character wanders from the plot. It adds another dimension to the story and takes my characters to places I hadn’t originally thought of. If they try to take over the story, well, I usually let them, making sure what they do ties in with my main character. And I can always rein them in if they get too far off the mark.

If you were in a tight corner and had to rely on one of your characters to save you, which would it be and why?

That would be Valentine from Two Guys from Vancouver. Not only is he sweet and dependable, but he would do anything to help his friends. He has a kind heart and doesn’t like to see anyone in trouble. And when it comes to helping his friends, he never backs down from a fight.

If you had no constraints of time and a guarantee of publication, what book would you write?

I write the books I want to regardless of a guarantee of publication. At the moment I’m doing research for a book involving hoodoo bokors and zombies. After that, I want to write the third story in my ALEX series, involving psychics and killers and a little boy lost. Hopefully they’ll be published, but I’m writing them anyway.

Is there a classic book you started and simply couldn't finish?

Moby Dick. I’m intrigued by the whole psychological aspect of the story, but the writing is simply too dry for me.

What’s your favourite gay romance/other genre book? And why?

That would be A Charm of Magpies series by K.J. Charles. Intriguing, plot driven, Victorian novels with characters I’ve come to love and admire.

Warning: Contains hot m/m sex between a deeply inappropriate earl and a very confused magician, dark plots in a magical version of Victorian England, family values (not the good kind), and a lot of swearing.

What's your next project?

At the moment I’m doing my final read through for a story, Robin’s Confession, I’m submitting to another charity anthology called Turn the Page. The specific focus of this project is suicide prevention and awareness. The planned beneficiaries (at this point, subject to change) are: The Trevor Project (local chapter), Prevent Suicide Wisconsin, HOPES – Helping Others Prevent and Educate about Suicide, and Suicide Prevention Resource Center – UWM (Milwaukee), with a tentative release date of October 8, 2016

Robin’s Confession

How can Robin find true love without accepting himself first?

Sweet, shy, gender fluid; Robin hides who he is, molding himself into what society views as ‘normal’, finding solace in the intricate pattern of scars he carves into his arms.

That is, until he starts dating Jase, the new man at his father’s construction company and the one who seems to want Robin for who he is, dresses and all. Jase even stands up to his own parents for Robin’s sake, risking his father’s anger and his chance to go to college. Robin is poised on the edge of happiness, ready to step into Jase’s open arms. Yet how can he believe in Jase’s love without first learning to believe in himself?

charliecochrane [userpic]

Up, up and away

August 20th, 2016 (08:10 pm)

I do like a hot air balloon. There used to be an annual festival in Southampton and one would stand in the garden and see Bertie Bassett or the FA Cup flying overhead. I do miss it, so was delighted to see these over Esslingen yesterday.

IMG_1008

charliecochrane [userpic]

Newsletter 156

August 19th, 2016 (08:12 am)

Glorious summer seems to be coming to an end in the UK with a return to our normal diet of unsettled weather. But nil desperandum, as we’re all glued to our TV sets watching the Olympics, shouting, “Go Mo! Go Laura!” and the like.

News

Dr Jonty Stewart has been waxing lyrical about his favourite sonnet as a guest at his friend's Live Journal. Do drop in and see what he has to say.

The Summer’s Day anthology project is now available, in support of the “It Gets Better”. What better way to celebrate old Will Shakespeare at the same time?

Amazon.com | Amazon UK | Amazon CA | Amazon AUS

Smashwords

Excerpt from my story, If Music Be:

Once he’d got the kettle on and some bacon grilling, Rick distracted Coldstream by giving him some ribbon off a present to play with and set to work unwrapping. The expected cheque from his parents, Amazon voucher from his brother and then Aunt Clare’s offering. She always put so much effort into choosing the right thing and always fell so wide of the mark. He ripped off the paper, then felt a wave of queasiness at the CD she’d chosen.

Military wives.

Why the hell had Aunt Clare gone for that? He vaguely remembered the TV show; there’d been a choir of women whose husbands were deployed with the forces abroad, singing the sort of songs Rick didn’t really care for. He quickly stuffed the CD into the nearest drawer and tried to forget about it.

What about military husbands? It wasn’t only “brave little women” who were left at home to cope with yearning hearts; there were plenty of blokes among that band these days, or so Rick assumed. Difficult to know for sure when he and Steve had always kept their relationship under wraps.  As far as their mates—and most of their family—were concerned, they’d been simply friends, sharing a flat when Steve was on leave, and the plan was for that situation to continue until Steve finished his final tour of duty. That tour had finished prematurely, and not in the way they’d wanted.

Rick’s parents had supported him through the return of the body, the funeral, the months afterwards, but however kind the attitude of people around him, the subtle difference in their perceptions—that he was grieving for a friend rather than grieving for a partner—stuck in his craw.

charliecochrane [userpic]

A word to authors being interviewed

August 11th, 2016 (08:49 am)

I conduct a lot of author interviews, both for my blogs and for The Big Thrill, the International Thriller Writers' magazine. Most people provide responses which are interesting, amusing, informative, etc. Responses which are a real advert for their books. Some people, however - well, it's like getting blood from a stone. I receive answers which are shorter than the questions, which can't be good, and ones which are badly written (repetitive, grammatically poor or the like) that I end up redrafting in the case of The Big Thrill, where I feel responsibility for the quality of content.

So, my fellow authors, think of this. If your interviews are naff, doesn't it suggest that your books are naff, too?

Contemplate this wonderful zebra while you're at it.

charliecochrane [userpic]

Jonty Stewart discusses his favourite sonnet

August 6th, 2016 (07:12 pm)

Over the nodbear 's journal. See what he's prattling on about and his rather startling theory!

charliecochrane [userpic]

Newsletter 155

August 5th, 2016 (04:52 pm)

Just a quick note to say I haven’t fallen off the face of the earth. We had internet issues back end of our Welsh holiday so the last due date for a newsletter came and went. We’re home now, at least temporarily (don’t ask!) so am reporting in.

News

Am delighted to be part of the Summer’s Day anthology project, along with my old mucker JL Merrow.

Come and have a look at the neat cover and why we were delighted to support a cause such as “It Gets Better” and celebrate old Will Shakespeare at the same time.

Writing:

Well, researching in this case. With the Olympics almost upon us, it’s great to be able to browse such a cool site as this celebrating the Olympians of WWI.

And finally...

Have one of the lovely seals we saw off the Mumbles.

no title

charliecochrane [userpic]

Newsletter 155

August 5th, 2016 (04:51 pm)

Just a quick note to say I haven’t fallen off the face of the earth. We had internet issues back end of our Welsh holiday so the last due date for a newsletter came and went. We’re home now, at least temporarily (don’t ask!) so am reporting in.

News

Am delighted to be part of the Summer’s Day anthology project, along with my old mucker JL Merrow.

Come and have a look at the neat cover and why we were delighted to support a cause such as “It Gets Better” and celebrate old Will Shakespeare at the same time.

Writing:

Well, researching in this case. With the Olympics almost upon us, it’s great to be able to browse such a cool site as this celebrating the Olympians of WWI.

And finally...

Have one of the lovely seals we saw off the Mumbles.

< back | 0 - 10 |